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Friday Five: November 13 - 17

  • 4375ca54bc742d71b44c90efb7b947f6 Friday Five
  • Readingtime icon 7f6ed98687a2fde2a669bc10ecaf08c2c2652e20d8cb845f194123a080e1f57b Read in: 5 mins
  • by: Jerry Caggiano

Tesla unveils the new Roadster (TechCrunch)

Move over Bugatti, the Roadster is back. The new Tesla Roadster returns in 2020 with a 0-60 in just 1.9 seconds. That’s almost twice as fast as a new Corvette. The Tesla Roadster proves electric cars are the future. With a top speed of over 250 mph there has never  been a production car able to achieve speed quite like it. Also, there has never been an electric car with a range comparable to the Roadsters 630 miles.

 

Apple’s new ad shows how iPads are going to replace laptops (TechCrunch)

As Apple seeks to become the first $1 Trillion company they have made a bold statement in their most recent ad, “What’s a computer?”. As laptops replace desktops, Apple believes tablets will replace computers. The second iPad Pro runs IOS11 and is shown in the commercial to be perfect for a “new spontaneous lifestyle”.

 

Boston Dynamics’ Bipedal Robot Can Now Do a Backflip (BostonDynamics)

A backflip may not be the most practical of motions for a robot, but it helps prove that the balance does not fail. The bipedal robot called Atlas, boasts life-like manners, and motion. There is also another quadrupedal robot called called spot mini that boasts the same life like manners and motion.

 

Williams-Sonoma is buying into AR, literally (CNET)

Following suit with Ikea, Amazon, and Wayfair, Williams-Sonoma is buying into AR for $112 million. Williams-Sonoma is acquiring Outward, an Augmented Reality and 3D scanning company, to make the kitchenware and furniture giant more interactive. As mobile shopping grows more popular, augmented reality is becoming a great technology to show shoppers what an item may look like in their space.

 

Teenage Engineering shows smart speakers don’t have to all look boring (The verge)

As companies introduce smart speakers to the market, the trend has been to make them look as plain as possible. “Apple’s HomePod is just a rounded cylinder, Amazon’s latest Echo is a cylinder with a fabric cover, and Google’s Home mini keeps the fabric but squashes the shape down to a donut.” Unlike these, Teenage Engineering has gone in a different direction bringing color, lights and a playful design.